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Center for Opioid Safety
  Education (COSE) new!

OD SUmmit 2015



Download & share!

Overdose Prevention Education brochure
[brochure, March 2015]


Overdose Prevention Education brochure[poster: 8.5x11, 11x17,
April 2015]



 


Opioid Overdose Prevention Education

Learn how you can save a life:
WATCH a video, REVIEW the steps, then TAKE A QUIZ.

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A community health worker expains overdose prevention and demonstrates how to administer intra-nasal naloxone (Narcan™) in an overdose. Also in Spanish and Russian. Alternate version shows use of intra-muscular naloxone. Produced by New York City Department of Health. A doctor teaches patients, their families and friends, what to do in case of overdose from prescription opioids, including how to administer the opioid antidote naloxone (Narcan™). Produced by Project Lazarus.

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Review: Overdose and Good Samaritan Law

1. Check for signs of opioid overdose.

  • Slow or no breathing
  • Gurgling, gasping or snoring
  • Clammy, cool skin
  • Blue lips or nails


2. Try to wake them up.

Rub your knuckles hard over their chest bone. If they don't wake up, they need medical help right away.


3. Call 911.

Tell 911:

  • A person is not breathing.
  • The address and where to find the person.


4. Start rescue breathing.

  • Tilt head back. Life chin. Pinch nose.
  • Give 2 quick breaths. Chest should rise.
  • Then 1 slow breath every 5 seconds.
  • Keep going until they start breathing or help arrives.

 

4. Give naloxone.

Injectable naloxone

  • Inject into the arm or upper outer top of thigh muscle, 1 cc at a time.

Give the naloxone 2-3 minutes to work. Keep doing rescue breathing -- oxygen is critical! If the person is still not breathing after 2-3 minutes, give a second dose of naloxone.

Click here to learn about auto-injectable naloxone: http://evzio.com/hcp.


5. Stay with the person and keep them breathing.

  • If they wake up and start breathing, stay with them.
  • Naloxone wears off in 30-90 minutes. When it does, the person could stop breathing again. Watch them until medical help arrives.
  • Place the person into the recovery position (on their side) so they can breathe and won't choke on any vomit.
  • If you must leae, put the person in a place where they can easily be found.


6. Encourage follow-up medical care.

After treating an overdose with naloxone, the person can easily slip back into overdose and stop breathing again. Help the person get to the ER (or emergency personnel may take them). Health care staff will:

  • Relieve symptoms of withdrawal.
  • Monitor breathing and risks for another overdose.
  • Treat any other medical conditions.


7. WA State's 911 Good Samaritan/Overdose Law.

Under this law:

  • Bystanders are allowed to carry and administer naloxone if they suspect an overdose.
  • No one who tries to help in an overdose can be prosecuted for having a small amount of medication or drugs.
  • The overdose victim is also protected.

The law, however, does not protect you or the overdose victim from other crimes or warrants.

 

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Check Your Understanding with a Short Quiz

This information made available by the UW Alcohol & Drug Abuse Instititute
http://stopoverdose.org

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